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Chairs Made of Ocean Waste are the Wave of the Future

This chair made out of recycled ocean plastic costs just $100, and it’s a stunner. This one is a dark emerald green, but not all will look the same. Each individual chair gets it color from the recycled plastic that was used to make it.

This is the S-1500 chair, developed by the architecture and design firm Snøhetta for the furniture producer  Nordic Comfort Products  (NCP).

This is the S-1500 chair, developed by the architecture and design firm Snøhetta for the furniture producer Nordic Comfort Products (NCP).

Snøhetta opened a small research facility around two years ago to beginning seeing how recycled plastic could work as a building material. Snøhetta architect Stian Ekkernes Rossi wanted to see how he could use the material. NCP found out about the work, and hired Snøhetta to redesign one of its most successful chairs. Their chairs normally required virgin plastic, but with the developments made they were able to create the chairs using fishing nets. Instead of importing plastic from China, the company found that they were able to collect  used plastic from the local farmed salmon industry inside just a 12-mile radius.

“One of our goals was to do a project to inspire and show the industry that you can actually make businesses out of what they today consider as trash.....through design and architecture, plastic becomes a resource.”
— Rossi in an Interview with Fast Company

The nets are processed into pellets to be put into the mold. The marble effect is created by the sequence that the pellets are added to the mold. Rossi refuses to add color to the pellets, as the pellets already have a variety of blues, greens, and yellows that mix beautifully.

The chair will go on sale later this year.

Snøhetta isn’t the only company trying to appeal to the new environmental standards that their audiences seem to want. Companies like Ikea, Adidas, Everlane, and various smaller startups are trying to use recycled ocean plastic and other recycled plastics to reduce the use of virgin plastic.

Wauwatosa Mural Corridor

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